Style: Tidying Up – A Short Part II on Folding

So a few people wanted a bit more information on the actual nitty gritty of the “Life Changing Magic of Tidying-Up” process. Without reading the book there’s not much more I can tell you about the mental and emotional process but the physical side, I can offer some additional assistance for sure.

I really feel like this book is a good purchase for those who are interested (even if you think you’re only hesitantly interested, I recommend it) so I don’t want to give too much detail. Buy the book! It’s US$7.70 for the paperback! But I do want to go over some things that are hard to describe in words. Specifically, folding techniques. In her companion book, Spark Joy, author Marie Kondo mostly repeats herself to be quite honest but she also does have some moderately but not hugely helpful diagrams of folding. I thought to save your additional $10 I’d just take some pictures.

Now, I’m no expert. I’ve just started doing this. I’m new. So just … take all this with a grain of salt okay?

Her basic folding advice is to figure out how your clothing wants to be folded. In order to do this, you figure out how to fold it vertically in order to make it stand up more or less by itself (a note on this later), and to make the folds you’ve made “stick”. Let’s start small.

Socks.

One of the greatest revelations in the book is that socks don’t need to be folded over themselves to be kept together. Just fold them in halves or thirds depending on length, and line them up. Kondo says that this helps the socks to rest after the hard work of being between your foot and the ground or your shoe all the damn time, you monster.

Underwear gets a little bit more complex, and yet still very beautiful. Firstly can we talk about how much I love you all that I’m showing you my underwear? Not the fancy stuff. That’s for my husband’s eyes only. Deal with it. Here we go.

You want to fold the crotchal region up, then the outsides towards the inside, then in half again. Donezo!

T-shirts are a little more confusing and complex. I had a head start with this method because this is more or less how my husband has always folded his shirts (because his mum folded them like this, clever lady). Like the underwear, you want to make a rectangle then smaller rectangles (in fact that describes the majority of folding techniques in this method).

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Still with me? Okay so what about jeans & pants, I hear you say? Right. The key for pants is to tuck in the pointy crotch bit. ……………..

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Aaaaanyway. Observe! First, fold the legs against each other and fold the legs in half.

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Then – and this is key – fold the crotch point in. Sometimes I tuck it underneath the lower part of the legs but for the purpose of this photo I left the crotch point on top.

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Then you want to fold the jeans into thirds.

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I find that this is the number of folds to make pants and jeans the most stable. Depending on the fabric, length of legs and how you’re going to store them, this may be different for you. You might need more folds, or less (shorts would be fine in half, I think). It’s trial and error – use your judgment.

Same kinda thing for leggings, though you may find that they need additional folds for reasons described above:

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Tank tops are relatively straightforward – just make sure you fold the straps on the inside to keep things neat and to keep any fragile straps (which I don’t own, for huge boob reasons) protected. Again it’s just rectangles inside rectangles to make a neat rectangle.

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Now this next one is challenging. I am still working on getting better at these. The dreaded long sleeve shirt. Now, the basic method stays the same. Create a rectangle then smaller rectangles. It’s just hard because there’s more fabric. The key, I think, is to make the sleeves fold as flat against the first rectangle as possible. Like so:

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I didn’t bother taking pics of the rest of this, because it is mostly is exactly the same as the first shirt after this point. Fold one side of the shirt + sleeve in as usual then bring that sleeve back in line with the folded side. I hope this makes sense. Let me know if it doesn’t and I’ll try to take better pictures but I was running out of time (and space) at this point!

So, I wanted to also add a couple of notes about storage. The way you fold is going to be heavily influenced by how much room you have. For instance, if you have a long drawer and you don’t have enough stuff to fill the length of the drawer then you might have things falling over. These things should be posted with the “clean fold” up, and the open edge of the rectangle on the bottom of the drawer. That makes them more stable. But if they’re still flopping over the place and you don’t think they could benefit from different amounts of folds, then put them into boxes (shoeboxes work great for this) and put the boxes into drawers. Like I did with my pants and thermals:

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Kondo also talks about making your folded clothing into “bento boxes” – different folding directions and patterns can be very aesthetically pleasing 🙂 So I’ve been trying out different patterns with that too – including setting my tights on end like sushi rolls, lol.

I hope this helps with the folding technique questions!

I’m going to do a Favorites post soon, sorry I’ve been so neglectful but life has been fucking bonkers lately. I still love you guys I SWEAR! I’m going to try to be more organised for February.

As always, let me know if you have any requests for posts!

Love++
F&V

 

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